Wild status.  See companion photo below

Ramblings on wildflowers

Photo gallery: Australian wildflowers

The purist might object to me calling all these 'wildflowers', some of them are Australian natives growing in gardens. I have concentrated on natives of Australia, although some of the flowers that I've photographed in the wild could well be ferals.

The orchids were photographed by my brother. Photographs of other subjects are available via the home page.

Adelaide Region
Clare Valley
Crystal Brook
Eyre Peninsula
Far North of S.Aust.
Western Australia
Index
Created about March 2002
Modified 2006/01/05
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Clare Valley

Acacia notabilis, Notable Wattle
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A native Acacia notabilis on a roadside nature strip at 'Elysium' near Armagh.

There is a bee gathering pollen. Wattle flowers are nectarless (Accacias of South Australia, Whibley & Symon), but the bees gather the pollen.

Many other trees at Elysium (Armagh, Clare, South Australia) are discussed in Clare trees.

Hardenbergia violacea, violet A native Hardenbergia violacea in a bush garden at 'Elysium' near Armagh.

Again, there is a bee.

This is a fairly hardy plant, easy to grow, but it does need to be watered in the Clare Summers to do well. It can do very well where it can get its roots down a well, or where the water table is high and the groundwater is not saline.

Hardenbergia violacea Alba
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The white variety, Alba, of Hardenbergia violacea in the same bush garden as the photo above.

These climbers flower profusely, and for quite a long time, around August and September each year.

Kennedya nigricans Kennedya nigricans, common name, black coral-pea, growing at 'Elysium'.

The flowers are mostly black, with some yellow. While this colour does not lead to spectacular displays, it is striking in its rarity.

It flowers around August and September and is a hardy native climber.

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Crystal Brook

Most of these are either in my own home garden, or in the garden around my office.

A bee on a Sturt Desert Rose (Gossypium sturtianum).  G.s. 
is an Australian native related to commercial cotton. Sturt's Desert Rose, Gossypium sturtianum, is the Northern Territory's floral emblem. Apart from the NT it grows wild through the northern areas of South Australia and is an easy shrub for the home gardener in the agricultural districts of SA.

Note the bee.

A native Australian Grevillea
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A native Grevillea. The photo was taken in a bush garden at Crystal Brook.

I love the contrast between the pink and the deep green.

Hardenbergia violacia and Senna nemophila Hardenbergia violacea with Senna flowers in the background. I planted both of these in the SA Water garden at Crystal Brook. (Let's face it, if I don't do some gardening there, no one else will do any!)

Native hibiscus in a garden at Crystal Brook, S. Australia
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Native hibiscus (Alyogyne huegelii) in a bush garden at Crystal Brook. The large shrub bearing these flowers is just outside of my office. It is quite common on the southern end of Eyre Peninsula, S. Aust.

Unfortunately the shrub tends to become straggly and untidy as it gets older.

Callistemon, Crystal Brook, S. Australia Another small tree (Callistemon) just outside of my office window. The common name for this genus, appropriately, is bottlebrush.

Callistemon, Crystal Brook, S. Australia
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A Callistemon blossom close-up. Callistemons are in the same family as Melaleuca and Eucalyptus.

Melaleuca, Crystal Brook, S. Australia In the same garden is the Melaleuca tree that bears these blossoms.


The Adelaide Region of South Australia

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Spider Orchid, Onkaparinga Gorge, S. Australia A spider orchid in ?September 2001. This, also, was seen while bushwalking in Hardie's scrub in the Onkaparinga Gorge.

Sun Orchid, Onkaparinga Gorge, S. Australia A sun orchid in ?September 2001. This was seen while bushwalking in Hardie's scrub in the Onkaparinga Gorge.


The Eyre Peninsula of South Australia

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Yacca, Eyre Peninsula A yacca, Xanthorrhoea, flowering in October 2001 in the Wanilla area. The leaves around the base are pulled into a bunch by the snotty-gobble creeper wrapped around the yacca.

The snotty-gobble (otherwise known as slender devil's twine) Cassytha glabella has very fine stems and minute leaves. It is not visible in this photo.

Yacca, close-up of flower-head, Eyre Peninsula A close-up of the flower-head of the same yacca as that above.

One can lick the nectar from the flowers. Aborigines used to obtain some of their sustenance this way.

There is another yacca photo on the home page.

Unknown flower, Eyre Peninsula
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I could not work this one out. After looking at this page Anne Turner informed me that it is Clematis microphylla, in the Ranunculceae family, common name old man's beard. She said that this feathery stuff is the seed (formally fruit).

It was on a creeper on roadsides in the Wanilla area.

Eucalyptus porosa, Eyre Peninsula The mallee box, (Eucalyptus porosa), is common through much of the cereal growing areas of South Australia.

This one was in flower when I was working in the area in October 2001.

Wild status, Eyre Peninsula Fresh status; it looks little different when it has dried. Found growing on the roadside near the Iron Duke mine. My reference book indicates that its botanical name could be Limonium latifolium, in which case it is a native to Bulgaria and the Caucasus.


Far north of South Australia

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Back-lit grass, Musgrave Ranges, S. Australia The flower-heads of these grasses seemed to be glowing! Light from the lowering sun was shining through the feathery heads and being scattered.

An example of how the right light can change a subject.


Western Australia

Kangaroo paw, W. Australia The floral emblem of Western Australia, the Kangaroo paw.

Wildflows near Kalbarri, W. Australia
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Sorry, I have no idea of the name of this one. The photo was taken near Kalbarri.

Wildflows near Eniaba, W. Australia One doesn't seem to see such large displays of wide varieties of wildflowers anywhere in Australia other than WA. This photo was taken near Eniaba (inland of Geraldton).

Wildflows near Eniaba, W. Australia Another photo in the same area. The soil here is very sandy. Actually, the soil in most of the southern half of WA seems to be sandy! (This is no more than a slight exaggeration; if it's not sandy, it's lateritic, or very thin rubbly weathered granite.)


Index

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On this page...
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Acacia notabilis | Adelaide Region | Alyogyne huegelii | Bottlebrush | Callistemon | Clare Valley | Crystal Brook | Eucalyptus porosa | Eyre Peninsula | Far North | Grevillea | Hardenbergia and Senna | Hardenbergia violacea Alba | Hardenbergia violacea | Kangaroo paw | Kennedya nigricans | Mallee box | Melaleuca | Native hibiscus | Orchid, spider | Orchid, sun | Status 1 | Status 2 | Sturts Desert Rose | Western Australia | Wildflowers< | Xanthorrhoea | Yacca |