Suicide as a rational decision

Suicide is often assumed to be connected with some sort of irrational action, perhaps when someone suicides they were in the grip of clinical depression; or perhaps people who heard about the suicide might jump to the conclusion that it was brought on by depression.

This page is about making a rational decision to suicide, or not.

This page written 2018/03/09 – ©
Contact: email daveclarkecb@yahoo.com (David K. Clarke)

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Humans in good mental health and of reasonable intelligence are organisms capable of comprehending their own existence, and of deciding on when that existence becomes sufficiently burdensome that it is no longer desirable.

No one else, no society, no religious group, no government, has any right to interfere in that decision. Whether or not a 'terminal illness' is involved is irrelevant; we are all going to die, it's just a matter of time.

Before ending his (or her) own life, however, the person has to consider the impact of his decision on those who are dear to him, and to whom he may be dear, and any who may be dependent upon him (children, spouse).

The relevant questions he must ask are:

  • Am I enjoying life?
  • If not, is that a temporary condition? Depression? Will the condition improve with time?
  • Am I a net asset to, or burden on, society and those around me?
  • What impact would my suicide have on my family? Can I prepare them for that?
Advanced age and deteriorating health and fitness may well be a factor in whether a person decides he has had enough. Living with pain is pretty miserable.

Related pages

On this site

Ethics generally
Some thoughts on death
Some thoughts on euthanasia and assisted suicide