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Gleeson Wetlands Plants

Plant species list

Some of the species that have been planted at Gleeson Wetlands. The links connect with photos on this page.

Botanical nameCommon nameForm
Acacia acinacea Gold dust wattleTall shrub
Acacia hakeoides Hakea wattleShrub
Acacia ligulataUmbrella bushLarge shrub
Acacia notabilisNotable wattleShrub
Acacia paradoxa Kangaroo thornLarge shrub
Acacia pycnantha Golden WattleSmall tree
Acacia retinodes Swamp wattleTall shrub
Acacia salicina Broughton willow wattleLarge tree
Acacua spilleriana Spiller's wattleLow shrub/ground cover (rare)
Acacia wattsiana Watt's wattle, dog wattleLarge shrub?
Allocasuarina verticillataDrooping sheoakTall tree
Alyogyne speciesNative HibiscusLarge shrub
Atriplex semibaccata SaltbushGround cover
Botanical nameCommon nameForm
Atriplex suberecta SaltbushLow shrub/ground cover
Austrodanthonia species Wallaby grassLow grass
Banksia marginataSilver banksiaShrub
Callistemon rugulosusScarlet bottlebrush, Wimmera bottlebrushSmall tree
Callitris preissiiCypress pineMedium tree
Carex appressaTall sedgeSedge
Carpobrotus glaucescens Angular pigface (there are two species in the wetlands) Succulent groundcover
Cassinia laevis Native daisyShrub
Cyperus gymnocaulosSpiny flat sedgeSedge
Dodonea viscosaSticky hop bushShrub
Enchylaena tomentosa Ruby saltbushSmall shrub
Eucalyptus caeseaSilver princessMedium tree
Eucalyptus erythrocorysRed capped gumMedium tree
Eucalyptus microcarpaGrey boxTree
Ficinia nodosaKnobby club rushSedge
Botanical nameCommon nameForm
Hardenbergia violacea Purple coral pea, happy wanderer, ...Climber
Juncus kraussiiSee rushSedge
Melaleuca lanceolataDry land tea-treeSmall tree
Muehlenbeckia cunninghamiiLignumShrub
Myoporum montanum BoobiallaSmall tree
Myoporum parviflorum Creeping boobiallaGround cover
Olearia ramulosa Twiggy daisy-bush, yellow hakea, curry bushShrub
Poa labillardieriCommon tussock grassGrass
Senna artemisioidesBlunt-leaved sennaShrub
Themeda triandra Kangaroo grassGrass
Vittadinia species VittadiniaLow daisy
Xanthorrhoea quadrangulataYaccaShrub


 
Plant marker
Plant marker
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Pat Williams organised around 75 plant markers like this one.




Planting notes

This section was added in early December 2015

 
Some of the earlier guards
Guards
The guards protected plants against browsing and also from spray drift.
Photo date: 2015/08/20

Autumn 2015

About 600 creeping boobialla cuttings were put into square tubes during Autumn and right into winter. Those that were planted in winter were kept in a cold frame (a small greenhouse) to raise the temperature. Rooting percentage was very high up until late winter when the rooting process seemed to become less successful.

Several hundred seedlings in round plastic sleeves were received from Trees For Life growers and from Council. These were progressively planted out over the next few months.

Winter 2015

In the winter of 2016 a number of trees fell over, the roots having insufficient hold in the sodden ground. Quite a few ruby salbush plants died too; apparently due to some disease. Winter of 2016 was much harder on the vegetation than the previous summer.

Many creeping boobialla rooted cuttings and Trees For Life seedlings were planted during the winter of 2015. Growth was very slow to the point of being negligible. With very little growth the small plants were prey to browsing animals, competition from weeds and possibly diseases, etc.

We started using guards in late July 2015; this seemed to have been very effective in stopping browsing.

Spring 2015

Spring seems to me to be the best time of the year to plant in the Clare Valley if the plants are expected to largely look after themselves.

 

Notes on rooting creeping boobialla cuttings

Can be done with a high success rate in Autumn in the open, and in the first two months of Winter so long as a greenhouse is used. I cut pieces about 150-200mm long, cut the leaves from the bottom half and poked this into a 50mm x 50mm x 125mm square tube full of potting mix. These were then kept damp for at least a month, by which time the great majority of the cuttings had rooted. Successful rooting could be checked by looking for roots coming out of the bottom of the tubes.
I tried to plant about 20-25 plants every morning I had at the wetland in the spring of 2015.
Method;

  • Loosen an area of soil to near the depth of a digging fork about 30cm x 30cm;
  • Plant seedling/rootling; (seedlings should not be pulled out of tubes; plastic film tubes should be cut off, and reusable tubes containing seedlings should be tapped on the top until the soil lump slides out).
  • Saturate the loosened volume of earth (perhaps 5 litres of water);
  • Place guard;
  • Mulch inside and especially outside of the guard to a radius of about 40cm.
In my experience seedlings planted like this generally survive the Summer, but if they can be soaked again once or twice during the summer, so much the better.

On a few days in 2015 I planted pigface cuttings, without any preliminary rooting; this gave perhaps a 70% success rate. More pigface cuttings were planted in late August of 2016.

Toward the end of spring 2015 about five more boxes of Trees For Life seedlings were received from Council.

Summer 2015/16

Growth through the summer of 2015/16 was very strong. Very few plants were lost to the heat or dryness.

The ground became too dry and hard for planting in early December of 2015 except where the ground had been protected from evaporation by a thick layer of mulch and there were few weeds and other plants.

2016 and early 2017

Planting continued when practical, but I did not keep specific notes, except that around a hundred yacca (Xanthorrhoea quadrangulata) seedlings were planted in late 2016. I also planted an unknown number of mixed native species, perhaps 50 native cypress-pine, (Callitris preissii), several native hibiscus, (Alyogyne species), as well as a few gungurru (silver princess, Eucalyptus caesea) and red capped gum (Eucalyptus erythrocorys) in 2016.

Other Lions, particularly Allan Mayfield, have also planted at various times.

Late Winter 2017

Planting started on 2017/08/24 with a group of kids from Vineyard School. They planed about a dozen seedlings and perhaps 50 boobialla and pigface cuttings. I consolidated many of these plantings and continued planting cuttings over the following few days.

I have about a hundred seedlings that came from Ian Roberts for planting in early Spring when the weather warms up a bit.

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Plant photos

There are many plants in the wetlands that I (Dave Clarke) cannot identify. I have started a herbarium to help with this problem.

The photos below are to help people identify the plants at the wetlands. They are in order of botanical name.

Acacia acinacea, Gold-dust wattle
A acinacia


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Acacia hakeoides, Hakea wattle
A hakeoides


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Acacia paradoxa, Kangaroo thorn
A paradoxa


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Acacia pycnantha, Golden wattle
Acacia pycnantha


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Acacia retinodes, Swamp wattle
Acacia retinodes


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Acacia salicina, Broughton willow wattle
Acacia salicina


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Acacia spilleriana, Spiller's wattle
Acacia spilleriana


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Acacia wattsiana, Dog wattle
A wattsiana


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Atriplex semibaccata, a prostrate saltbush
Atriplex semibaccata


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Atriplex suberecta, a saltbush
Saltbush


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Austrodanthonia species, Wallaby grass
Wallaby grass


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Carpobrotus glaucescens, a native pigface
Native pigface
Photo taken 2015/09/26


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Cassinia laevis?, native daisy
Native daisy


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Enchylaena tomentosa, Ruby saltbush
The berries are edible
Enchylaena tomentosa


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Hardenbergia violacea, Purple coral-pea, happy wanderer, etc.
Hardenbergia violacea


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Muehlenbeckia cunninghamii, Lignum
Lignum


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Myoporum montanum, Boobialla
Myoporum montanum


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Myoporum parviflorum, Creeping boobialla
Myoporum parviflorum
 



I've planted many more creeping boobialla rooted cuttings in the wetlands than any other plant.

The wetlands need cover on the ground. As Aristotle said, "Nature abhors a vacuum"; if we don't cover the bare soil with desirable plants we will get undesirable plants.

Creeping boobialla is an Australian native plant that, according to Wikipedia, "occurs in the south-west corner of New South Wales, and from the Eyre Peninsula in South Australia eastwards to Victoria. It is common along much of the Murray River in South Australia. It often grows on limestone cliffs, along river flats and in woodland in sandy sometimes saline soils."

It is a bonus that creeping boobialla is easily propagated from cuttings.

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Olearia ramulosa, Curry Bush
Olearia ramulosa


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Senna artemisioides, Blunt-leaved Senna
Senna artemisioides


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Themeda triandra, Kangaroo grass
Themeda triandra


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Vittadinia species, Vittadinia daisy
Vittadinia